Under The Jakfruit Tree

Cabbage Tree or Horseradish Tree? Turns out, both are correct depending on the species of Moringa. Moringa stenopetala (Cabbage Tree) and Moringa oleifera (Horseradish Tree) are the two common species of Moringa. Both have become popular with the health craze, due to the amount of protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins A, B12, and C in their leaves.

These two species are heralded as a powerful anti-aging agent, improves sleep, stabilizes blood sugar and blood pressure, and acts as an anti-inflammatory.

Richard Lyons Nursery has both of these species in stock.

Under The Jakfruit Tree

Brazilian Red Cloak (Megaskepasma erythrochlamys), a winter bloomer which can tolerate shady conditions, and attract hummingbirds to your landscape. What’s not to like? A very tropical looking shrub with large green leaves, contrasting against the bright red bracts which house tubular white flowers. It can be planted as a single specimen shrub, or as a privacy screen along your property. Whatever your design, it will add nice color to the landscape.

Richard Lyons Nursery currently has this large shrub in stock.

Under The Jakfruit Tree

Looking out the window, there is no mistaking the bright orange pendant raceme of blooms that contrast against the Poinciana-like feathery leaves and blue sky of Colville’s Glory Tree (Colvillea racemosa). It truly is, in all its glory right now. The tree is mostly upright with little crown spread, attaing a height of 30-50′ tall. Those bright orange flowers dangle off the ends of branches, making just a spectacular display. There’s no mistaking this tree when it’s in bloom in early fall in the South Florida landscape.

Richard Lyons Nursery currently has these trees in stock.

Under The Jakfruit Tree

The life cycle of the Atala Butterfly (Eumaeus atala), also known as the Coontie Hairstreak. This butterfly is native to southeastern Florida and the Caribbean Islands.

In the state of Florida it is still considered endangered due to loss of habitat and to some extent loss of its host plant, Zamia integrifolia (Coontie). First, in the 1800’s, several factories in Florida produced starch from the underground swollen root of the Coontie plant. Then in the early 1930’s and up until present day, habitat was lost due to development. Then, added to starch production and habitat loss, was the over collecting for the plant trade. All of these factors, almost led to the extinction of the Atala butterfly, which needs this plant to carry out its life cycle. Today, the butterfly’s numbers have rebounded, but its population remains fragmented due to the continued development in southeastern Florida, especially Broward and Miami-Dade counties.

Zamia integrifolia is now protected, and is illegal to harvest from the wild. Coupled with this, the plant is in abundant supply in cultivation, and regularly sold in nurseries for the homeowner to plant to attract this beautiful butterfly. Richard Lyons Nursery currently has this plant in stock.

Under The Jakfruit Tree

After a brief hiatus, we are back with another installment. This week I am highlighting a group of plants that are commonly called Elephant Ear Plants. These plants belong to the genus Alocasia. They are native to Asia, and they instantly give a shaded area that tropical look due to their very large leaves. Richard Lyons Nursery has the plants shown below plus some very large varieties not pictured.